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UNHEALTHY ATTITUDES



BULLYING AND DISCRIMINATION IN

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

 

 

Legal protections have been in place for over a decade but LGBT staff and patients continue to experience discrimination, abuse, and bullying. A quarter (24 percent) of patient-facing staff have heard their colleagues make negative remarks about lesbian, gay or bisexual people, or use discriminatory language like ‘poof’ or ‘dyke’, whilst at work in the last five years. One in five (20 percent) have heard similar disparaging remarks about trans people. One in twenty (five percent) patient-facing staff have witnessed other colleagues discriminate against or provide a patient or service user with poorer treatment because they are lesbian, gay or bisexual in the last five years. A quarter (26 percent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual staff say they have personally experienced bullying or poor treatment from colleagues in the last five years as a result of their sexual orientation. Almost one in ten (nine percent) health and social care staff are aware of colleagues experiencing discrimination or poor treatment because they are trans. One in fourteen (seven percent) say they would not feel ‘comfortable’ working alongside a trans colleague. Many health and social care staff report hearing homophobic, biphobic and transphobic language from their colleagues and some have even witnessed staff providing patients with poorer treatment because of their sexual orientation.

A quarter (24 percent) of patient-facing staff have heard their colleagues make negative remarks about lesbian, gay or bisexual people, or use discriminatory language like ‘poof’, ‘dyke’ or ‘queer’, whilst at work in the last five years. One in seven (14 percent) have heard such remarks in the last year alone.

One in five (20 percent) patient-facing staff have heard their colleagues make negative remarks about people who are trans or use discriminatory languages such as ‘tranny’ and ‘she-male’ in the last five years, and one in ten (ten percent) have witnessed such language in the last year alone. Other respondents also made derisory comments themselves:

One in twenty (five per cent) of all patient-facing staff have witnessed other colleagues discriminate against or provide a patient or service user with poorer treatment because they are lesbian, gay or bisexual in the last five years. Younger respondents are more aware of discrimination or poorer treatment towards lesbian, gay and bisexual patients and service users. Amongst 18 to 24 year olds, one in six (15 per cent) have witnessed such discrimination. Men were also twice as likely to witness discrimination as women (eight percent compared to four per cent). Lesbian, gay and bisexual staff are also significantly more likely to be aware of suchdiscrimination; one in five (21 per cent) have witnessed this.Furthermore, seven per cent, or one in fourteen patientfacingstaff, have witnessed bullying, abuse or harassment atwork towards a patient or service user because of theirsexual orientation over the same period.

DISCRIMINATION AT WORK

 

 

A quarter (26 percent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual health andsocial care staff say they have personally experienced bullying poorer treatment from colleagues in the last five years as a result of their sexual orientation. This included hearingabusive comments from colleagues:

One in six (16 per cent) of all health and social care staff saythat their lesbian, gay and bisexual colleagues experiencediscrimination or poorer treatment because of their sexualorientation at work. Almost one in ten (nine per cent) areaware of trans colleagues experiencing discrimination orpoorer treatment because they are trans.One in fourteen (seven per cent) health and social care staff say they would not feel ‘comfortable’ working alongside atrans colleague.

Discrimination from patients

 

 

Many health and social care staff work in an environmentwhere they also face hearing homophobic, biphobic andtransphobic abuse from patients and service users.

A quarter (26 per cent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual patientfacingstaff have personally been the target of bullying poor treatment due to their sexual orientation from patientsor service users at work in the last five years, and one in

seven (14 per cent) have experienced this in the last year.More than two in five (44 per cent) of all patient-facing staffhave heard patients and service users make negativeremarks about lesbian, gay or bisexual people, including staffor other patients, or use discriminatory language such as‘poof’ and ‘dyke’ in the last five years. A third (32 per cent) ofpatient-facing staff have witnessed such remarks in the lastyear alone.Respondents within the social care sector are somewhatmore likely than those in the healthcare sector to have heardpatients and service users make these type of negativeremarks in the last five years (48 per cent compared with 42per cent).

One in five (20 per cent) patient-facing staff have also heardpatients and service users make negative remarks aboutpeople who are trans in the last five years. One in ten (11 percent) have witnessed such remarks in the last year.

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About UNHEALTHY ATTITUDES

Achieving equality for LGBT patients and staff in health and social care will require the sector to think differently about how services are provided and managed. Fortunately, getting it right doesn't need to have a huge impact on budgets. In fact, many interventions cost next to nothing and our recommendations provide a range of practical solutions for health and social care providers to follow. Trans peoples’ healthcare needs sometimes require more specific care, so some of the excellent trans support organizations have also been signposted in this report.

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